QUIT! BEFORE YOU'RE A HEAD!

QUIT! BEFORE YOU'RE A HEAD!

PLAY IT COOL

As with space, we are not content to comprehend time only as infinite. For many people the pressing question is "How am I going to get through the next hour?" The more structured time is, the less difficult is this problem. Very busy people with many external demands do not have time on their hands. The "next hour" is very well programed. This programing, or structuring, is what people try to achieve, and when they are unable to do it themselves, they look to others to structure time for them. "What happens next?" "Tell me what to do." "What shall I do next?" "What we need is leadership!" "Are these skies friendly?" "Is this where the flavor is?" "Is Coke it?"

PLAYING WITH LEGO IS COOL - UNTIL IT'S NOT.

PLAYING WITH LEGO IS COOL - UNTIL IT'S NOT.

ONE BRICK AT A TIME

Continuing studies are sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Marketing Science Institute, and the Office of Child Development of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare; as a result, broadcasters and advertisers must keep a watchful eye on their commercial output. Findings from the National Attitude Survey include consumer endorsement of the notion that commercials actually help children mature, because "they learn from what they see." The difficulty here lies in determining just what kinds of material children should be learning. Monkey see - Monkey smoke.


Imitation is the sincerest form of television.
— Fred Allen

IDLE HANDS = THE DEVIL'S WORKSHOP

The Fairness Doctrine, contained in Section 315 of the Communications Act of 1934, was applied to advertising in 1967 when the FCC upheld the complaint of a New York attorney, John Banzhaff III ,who wanted cigarette commercials balanced with anti-smoking messages on a New York TV station; but the FCC also promised that this application of the doctrine would be the only extension of the rule. A number of additional complaints were were brought to the commission, however, and were followed by a series of decisions. The FCC upheld stations which denied reply time to (a) environmentalists who sought to refute certain oil company commercials, and (b) antiwar groups wishing to express their editorial viewpoints. In both instances, the commission's decision was reversed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Ultimately, though, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed the lower court, holding that the station licensees have the right to exercise editorial judgement and may not be required to sell time for editorial advertising merely because they sell time for commercial advertising.

BATTLE FOR THE MIND.

BATTLE FOR THE MIND.


All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.
— George Orwell

In American society we have perfected a remarkable form of censorship: to allow every one his political right to say what he believes, but to swamp his little boat with literally thousands of millions of newspapers, mass-circulation magazines, best-selling books, broadcasts, and public pronouncements that disregard what he says and give the official way of looking at things.


References:

I'M OK- YOU'RE OK : A Practical Guide to Transactional Analysis by Thomas A. Harris, M.D. Copyright 1967, 1968, 1969 Harper & Row, Publishers New York, New York

BROADCAST ADVERTISING A Comprehensive Working Textbook by Sherilyn K. Zeigler, Associate Professor Dept. of Advertising University of Tennessee and Herbert H. Howard, Associate Professor Dept. of Broadcasting University of Tennessee

THE OCCULT MEANING OF THE GREAT SEAL OF THE UNITED STATES by David L. Carrico

GROWING UP ABSURD by Paul Goodman Copyright 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960 Paul Goodman Vantage Books New York, New York